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Most recent 9/11-related cancer statistics released

Posted by Smiley & Smiley on Sep 16, 2013 2:48:53 PM

Last week, New Yorkers observed the loss that the city and the nation suffered on September 11, 2001. The memory of those who perished and the devastation experienced by loved ones of the victims will never be forgotten. However, the challenges that some first responders, Ground Zero construction site workers and lower Manhattan residents have been forced to endure have not remained squarely in the public consciousness.

For the first time since the World Trade Center Health Program expanded coverage to include treatments for 58 additional kinds of cancer in September of 2012, data on how many individuals are now suffering from 9/11-related cancers has been released. Twelve years after the Twin Towers came down, approximately 1,140 Americans who lived near Ground Zero or worked in the wreckage have developed cancer as a result of their exposure to toxins at the site.

This is critical data. Only two years ago, the administrator of the WTC Health Program insisted that the program would not cover cancer treatments due to what had been deemed inadequate linkage between cancer and toxic exposure in the aftermath of 9/11. Now, more than 1,100 individuals are receiving the care that they deserve.

It is imperative that Americans remember the immediate loss felt on 9/11/2001. However, it is also critical that no one forgets that families, workers and everyday Americans continue to suffer physical consequences directly related to the terrorist attacks and their aftermath. Taking care of those who survived, helped to identify victims and made Ground Zero a sacred site that could be safely visited is as important as remembering those who perished.

Source: CNN, “More than 1,100 have cancer after 9/11,” Sep. 11, 2013

Topics: Construction Accidents

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